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Posts Tagged ‘nonnegative matrix factorization’

Cluster Analysis, Part V: Monte Carlo NMF

Monday, January 11th, 2010

In this continuing series, we explore the NMath Stats functions for performing cluster analysis. (For previous posts, see Part 1 – PCA , Part 2 – K-Means, Part 3 – Hierarchical, and Part 4 – NMF.) The sample data set we’re using classifies 89 single malt scotch whiskies on a five-point scale (0-4) for 12 flavor characteristics. To visualize the data set and clusterings, we make use of the free Microsoft Chart Controls for .NET, which provide a basic set of charts.

In this post, the last in the series, we’ll look at how NMath provides a Monte Carlo method for performing multiple non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) clusterings using different random starting conditions, and combining the results.

NMF uses an iterative algorithm with random starting values for W and H. This, coupled with the fact that the factorization is not unique, means that if you cluster the columns of V multiple times, you may get different final clusterings. The consensus matrix is a way to average multiple clusterings, to produce a probability estimate that any pair of columns will be clustered together.
To compute the consensus matrix, the columns of V are clustered using NMF n times. Each clustering yields a connectivity matrix. Recall that the connectivity matrix is a symmetric matrix whose i, jth entry is 1 if columns i and j of V are clustered together, and 0 if they are not. The consensus matrix is also a symmetric matrix, whose i, jth entry is formed by taking the average of the i, jth entries of the n connectivity matrices.
Thus, each i, jth entry of the consensus matrix is a value between 0, when columns i and j are not clustered together on any of the runs, and 1, when columns i and j were clustered together on all runs. The i, jth entry of a consensus matrix may be considered, in some sense, a “probability” that columns i and j belong to the same cluster.

NMF uses an iterative algorithm with random starting values for W and H. (See Part IV for more information on NMF.) This, coupled with the fact that the factorization is not unique, means that if you cluster the columns of V multiple times, you may get different final clusterings. The consensus matrix is a way to average multiple clusterings, to produce a probability estimate that any pair of columns will be clustered together.
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Cluster Analysis, Part IV: Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF)

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

In this continuing series, we explore the NMath Stats functions for performing cluster analysis. (For previous posts, see Part 1 – PCA , Part 2 – K-Means, and Part 3 – Hierarchical.) The sample data set we’re using classifies 89 single malt scotch whiskies on a five-point scale (0-4) for 12 flavor characteristics. To visualize the data set and clusterings, we make use of the free Microsoft Chart Controls for .NET, which provide a basic set of charts.

In this post, we’ll cluster the scotches using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). NMF approximately factors a matrix V into two matrices, W and H:

wh

If V in an n x m matrix, then NMF can be used to approximately factor V into an n x r matrix W and an r x m matrix H. Usually r is chosen to be much smaller than either m or n, for dimension reduction. Thus, each column of V is approximated by a linear combination of the columns of W, with the coefficients being the corresponding column H. This extracts underlying features of the data as basis vectors in W, which can then be used for identification, clustering, and compression.
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